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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

En El Último Trago

La Santa Cecilia - En El Último Trago (En Vivo) ft. Eugenia León


Tómate esta botella conmigo 
Y en el último trago nos vamos 
Quiero ver a que sabe tu olvido 
Sin poner en mis ojos tus manos 
Esta noche no voy a rogarte 
Ésta noche te vas de a de veras 
Que difícil tener que dejarte 
Sin que sienta que ya no me quieras


Nada me han enseñado los años 
Siempre caigo en los mismos errores 
Otra vez a brindar con extraños 
Y a llorar por los mismos dolores


Tomate esta botella conmigo 
Y en el ultimo trago, me besas 
Esperamos que no haya testigos 
Por si acaso te diera vergüenza 
Si algún día sin querer tropezamos 
No te agaches ni mi hables de frente 
Simplemente la mano nos damos 
Y después que murmure la gente


Nada me han enseñado los años 
Siempre caigo en los mismos errores 
Otra vez a brindar con extraños 
Y a llorar por los mismos dolores


Tómate esta botella conmigo 
Y en el ultimo trago nos vamos


From Bandcamp:

In his original program notes for Sonatra, composer Michael Gordon writes that he conceived of the piece for solo piano as a sideways tribute to Frank Sinatra, but with the sonata form as an equal and opposite force that tugs at the music from within.

“I grew up playing, or mis-playing, the piano,” he notes. “When I started writing Sonatra, I decided that since I would probably only ever write one piano piece in my entire life, I wanted to use all the keys on the piano, and use them often. I constructed long chains or links of major and minor thirds that ceaselessly wind their way up and down the piano. Eventually they start cascading and intersperse with glissandos half the length of the keyboard, sounding to me like the performer has at least four hands.”

Sonatra is slightly more than 15 minutes in length, but when performed in both equal temperament and just intonation, as Bang on a Can All-Stars pianist Vicky Chow has done for her singular recording of the piece, it takes on the aura and personality of a two-part epic.

“It’s by far the most challenging piece of music I’ve worked on,” she says. “When I first looked at the score, I knew immediately that I’ll live with it for the rest of my life. Every few months, I slowly worked up each section, like chipping away at a slab of marble. I had to pace myself, push myself, and be sharp at every twist and turn, or else I’d trip and fall flat on my face.

“Performing it with just intonation adds another hurdle to overcome, because you can easily feel as though the arpeggios spiraling up and down the length of the keyboard are wrong. It adds one more sadistic layer to the traumatic physical experience a pianist or any other musician or athlete puts themselves through when trying to achieve an impossible feat. This is one of those pieces.”


released February 23, 2018

Everybody Loves The Sunshine

March 1, 2018 | Abby O'Neill -- Roy Ayers arrived at his Tiny Desk performance beaming with positivity. The 77-year-old funk icon and vibraphonist sauntered through the office with a Cheshire grin on his face, sharing jokes with anyone within earshot. Accompanying him was a trio of brilliantly seasoned musicians — keyboardist Mark Adams, bassist Trevor Allen and drummer Christopher De Carmine. Later during the performance, pride washed across Ayers' face as his bandmates took the spotlight. (Be sure to watch as Adams woos not just the room but brightens Ayers' face during his solo.)

The set began with one of Ayers' more recognizable hits: an extended version of "Searching," a song that embodies the eternal quest for peace and love. During "Black Family" (from his 1983 album Lots Of Love), you'll hear him call out "Fela" throughout. That's because Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti was a huge influence on Ayers in the late 1970s; the two eventually collaborated on an album, 1980's Music Of Many Colors. "Black Family" is, in part, a tribute to Fela, even if the original version didn't include his name.

Concluding this mini-concert, Ayers closed the set out with his signature tune, "Everybody Loves the Sunshine", a feel-good ode if there ever was one. The essence of this song flowed right through him and out to the NPR audience.


"Black Family"
"Everybody Loves The Sunshine"


Roy Ayers, Mark Adams (keyboards), Trevor Allen (bass), Christopher De Carmine (drums)


Producers: Abby O'Neill, Morgan Noelle Smith; Creative Director: Bob Boilen; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Morgan Noelle Smith, Kara Frame, Bronson Arcuri, Dani Lyman; Production Assistant: Joshua Bote; Photo: Jenna Sterner/NPR.

Confucius and the Madman

From Tiago Sousa's Bandcamp:

I find the concert to be a central moment in musical practice. I understand it as the only moment of truth regarding music. The entertainment industry imposes upon it normalization, flattening and simulation. It is the fiction and the separation which hold that simulation in place. In it we’re all playing and acting – the artists play off their personalities, all eccentric to a degree, and the audience plays off its voyeur role. This evidence is so strong that it becomes increasingly difficult to find moments of authenticity. Industry fears these moments so much that concerts have ceased to be this moment of truth to have become nothing but hullabaloo. The appreciation of this hullabaloo tends to be either alienating or merely technical. So, when I decided to release Samsara, the image of a lone piano on stage, given to the frailty of fingers that long to spread themselves over the piano keys as much as they long to see life and the world, presented itself to me not only as metaphor but also as reflection. The act of presenting ourselves this naked has become so rare that it can seem radical and new. An unforeseen, unforeseeable and adventurous moment. That is the path I search for with my concerts. They’ve ceased to be performances to have become life. Life that crosses paths with the everyday moments and takes part as much on a stage as it does in a living room.



From The New Yorker:

The arresting photograph that was chosen out of the hundreds, possibly thousands, of pictures Dukovic took of Yuja at the piano and, later, in the first-floor showroom, posed full figure in front of a piano with its lid up, represents her as no concertgoer has ever seen her. The wild disorder of the hair has never been seen in a concert hall. (Yuja’s hair tends to stay in place throughout the most rousing of her performances.) And the foreshortened, oversized hand is an obvious deviation from the consensus we call reality. Will Yuja cringe when she looks at the photograph? Or will she see it as expressive of her impudent, defiant nature and find in it, almost hear in it, an echo of her incomparable musicality?


Car Seat Headrest: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert

For a singer who's sought privacy in the parking lot of a Target so he could record vocals in the backseat of his car, Will Toledo hasn't been shy about sharing his work. By age 23, he'd already released a dozen albums. Toledo, who records under the name Car Seat Headrest, is prolific but never conventional.

He performed this Tiny Desk Concert mostly solo — with occasional input from his nearby Leesburg, Va., friends and Seattle bandmates — for a set that represents only a tiny sliver of what you'll find on a Car Seat Headrest album. Those records can be filled with rich textures, chaos and harmony, sometimes in the same few minutes. But what you're about to discover here is a wordsmith with a vision, wrapping his faults and frailties in a DIY sound that's still finely crafted.


Set List:
"The Drum"
"Drunk Drivers/Killer Whales"
"Sober To Death"


Producers: Bob Boilen, Morgan Walker, Niki Walker; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Morgan Walker, Niki Walker, Julia Reihs; Photo: Jun Tsuboike/NPR.

Four Shorts by Leo Adef

The Other Side from leo adef on Vimeo.

A young french boy takes a train to a new city to discover himself while he experiments for the first time a lot of new experiences about youth, sex, partying and friendship.

Short film directed by Leo Adef
Featuring Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello

Hercules Universal

Produced by Pandora -


Summer of love - i-D from leo adef on Vimeo.


Our own private scene (NOWNESS) from leo adef on Vimeo.

Filmmaker Leo Adef explores subculture and self-discovery in a coming-of-age portrait of three 17-years-olds in a small French town. Read more on NOWNESS -


VAMP - Tofel Santana from leo adef on Vimeo.

Directed by Leo Adef

DOP Angello Faccini
Stylist Eus Cantó
Head of production María Carboni
Assistant director Hector Prats
Art director Jorge Algaba
Hair and make up Regina Khanipova
Color grading Yulia Bulashenko


Mariachi Flor de Toloache's 2014 self-titled debut album earned a Latin Grammy nomination in the Best Ranchera category — quite an accomplishment, given that the category celebrates an incredibly long tradition of Mexican music. But it was no fluke: The group's members come by their mariachi skills honestly and with endless practice, while still looking for ways to take chances.

Still, the best way to introduce yourself to Mariachi Flor de Toloache is to see it live — something many have done as the band tours with The Arcs, both as members and as an opening act. It's got top-notch musicianship, mariachi swagger for days, and a performance style that captures all the power and emotion you'd hope for.


Set List

"Let Down"



Producers: Bobby Carter, Morgan Walker; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Morgan Walker, Julia Reihs; Production Assistant: Kate Drozynski; Photo by Jun Tsuboike/NPR