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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

Torbjørn Rødland

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From The New Yorker:

We can find signs of a narrative in the images collected in the new book “Confabulations,” by the Norwegian photographer Torbjørn Rødland. Symbols of childhood and adolescence, of marriage and death, and visual motifs—bent silverware, grasping hands, loose hair, wedding cake—seem to imply connections among the scenes. But trying to trace any clean story line through the photographs would result only in a messy sketch. Rødland told me that he allowed the title of the book, a psychiatric term for memories that are made up or distorted, to guide him in his editing. “There’s a pleasure in perforated narratives,” he said.

Tobias Zielony - Maskirovka, 2017

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Maskirovka, 2017

Tobias Zielony‘s new work produced in Ukraine between 2016 and 2017 focuses on the underground queer and techno scene in Kyiv in the aftermath of the 2013 revolution. 

The term ‚maskirovka‘ describes a tradition of Russian warfare tactics of deception. The so called „green men“ that occupied Crimea and helped pro-Russian forces in Eastern Ukraine were in fact Russian special forces wearing face masks to hide their identities, starting a hybrid war that was never officially declared.

The recent political developments as well as the Russian interference into the country‘s internal affairs can be seen as a sad travesty in which everything is possible but nothing seems to be real.

Robin de Puy - Randy

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From The New Yorker:

It was toward the end of an eight-thousand-mile road trip across America, in 2015, that the Dutch photographer Robin de Puy, riding her Harley-Davidson through the dry expanses of Ely, Nevada, discovered the subject destined to define her adventure: a skinny youth of fifteen, who flashed by, in the night, on a child’s bicycle. De Puy managed to stop him. Later, with wonder, she recalled the encounter in her diary: “Fragile-looking boy, striking face, big ears—a puppy, a golden retriever waiting for the ball to be thrown, (too) naive. ‘Can I photograph you?’ ” He consented, and posed for a picture, though de Puy neglected to mention that he was allowed to blink. Her model stared straight into the lens, unflinching, until tears dripped toward his lips.

James Greenhalgh

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From the British Journal of Photography (James Greenhalgh speaks):

I wasn’t supposed to get into photography. I was 15, doing my GCSEs, and I had to pick subjects for my AS-Levels. I had no prior background in the arts and I chose all academic subjects. I was later told that Anthropology, one of the subjects that I had picked, had been taken off the curriculum and I had to select another subject. Photography sounded the least boring so I reluctantly chose it. At that point in my life I thought I was going to become a computer programmer.

Mariette Pathy Allen

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Mariette Pathy Allen has been photographing the transgender community for over 30 years. Through her artistic practice, she has been a pioneering force in gender consciousness, contributing to numerous cultural and academic publications about gender variance and lecturing throughout the globe. Her first book "Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them" was groundbreaking in its investigation of a misunderstood community. Her second book "The Gender Frontier" is a collection of photographs, interviews, and essays covering political activism, youth, and the range of people that identify as transgender in mainland USA. It won the 2004 Lambda Literary Award in the Transgender/Genderqueer category. Daylight books has just published Mariette’s new book, “TransCuba”! It is available on Amazon or Daylight.

Mariette’s life’s work is being archived by Duke University's Rare Book and Manuscripts Library, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's Studies. In addition to her work with gender, Mariette’s background as a painter frequently leads her to photographic investigations of color, space, and cultural juxtapositions such as east/west, old/new, handmade/manufactured.

Nightswimming

NIGHTSWIMMING from Giovanna Silva on Vimeo.

NIGHTSWIMMING : DISCOTHEQUE IN ITALY FROM THE 1960s UNTIL NOW

The project examines the history of Italian dance clubs, as asocial and anthropological phenomenon. Italy’s social, cultural and economic evolution over the last 50 years has gradually transformed the idea of fun, and with it also the spaces in which fun takes shape. Today a paradox is evident: the clubs are no longer necessarily a physical place, but are now formed of events and theme nights. The history of Italian clubs is told through interviews with architects, DJs, writers, and intellectuals, as well as period photos and a new photographic survey of what remains of today’s discotheques.

project by Giovanna Silva

music by Stra - www.radiostra.com
team Alto Fragile, Chiara Carpenter, Michele Marchetti
with the support of Fulvio Ferrari, Michele Lombardelli

www.nightswimming.it

Joshua Woods

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From The New Yorker:

The thirty-year-old photographer Joshua Woods grew up in Harlem’s Le Petit Sénégal, a small enclave along West 116th Street, where, as a child, he heard fly, gold-chain-rocking, elder male émigrés speak gloriously of easy black living and independence in Senegalese cities like Dakar or Pikine. Woods dreamed of seeing it for himself and, like many African-Americans, of tracing his roots back to Africa. In early October of last year, he finally embarked, with his Pentax 6x7 film camera, on his first trip to the country. The pictures he made are diary-like reflections that celebrate black life in Senegal.

Hobbes Ginsberg

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hobbes ginsberg // 21 // based in LA 
self described “wannabe punk, new wave earnest white girl and at least a 7/10”, hobbes’ photos are candid, mythical, and ask important questions: “who am i? why am i here? do u love me bb?”
clients include VICE the FADER, BEAT mag, UNIF and more
available for hire and eager to travel