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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

Diane Arbus: In The Park

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From Retronaut:

The images Arbus made in Central Park and Washington Square are the subject of a new show, Diane Arbus: In the Park, on view at the Lévy Gorvy gallery in New York through June 24.

The exhibit features photos from throughout Arbus’ brief but storied 15-year career, including some of her most famous images, such as Child with a toy hand grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1962, as well as many others that have never before been displayed.

Hannah Starkey

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Using actors within carefully considered settings, Hannah Starkey’s photographs reconstruct scenes from everyday life with the concentrated stylisation of film. Starkey’s images picture women engaged in regular routines such as loitering in the street, sitting in cafes, or passively shopping. Starkey captures these generic ‘in between’ moments of daily life with a sense of relational detachment. Her still images operate as discomforting ‘pauses’; where the banality of existence is freeze-framed in crisis point, creating reflective instances of inner contemplation, isolation, and conflicting emotion. Through the staging of her scenes, Starkey’s images evoke suggestive narratives through their appropriation of cultural templates: issues of class, race, gender, and identity are implied through the physical appearance of her models or places. Adopting the devices of filmography, Starkey’s images are intensified with a pervasive voyeuristic intrusion, framing moments of intimacy for unapologetic consumption. Starkey often uses composition to heighten this sense of personal and emotional disconnection, with arrangements of lone figures separated from a group, or segregated with metaphoric physical divides such as tables or mirrors. Often titling her work as Untitled, followed by a generalised date of creation, her photographs parallel the interconnected vagueness of memory, recalling suggestions of events and emotions without fixed location or context. Her work presents a platform where fiction and reality are blurred, illustrating the gap between personal fragility and social construction, and merging the experiences of strangers with our own.

The Infinite Now

The Infinite Now from Armand Dijcks on Vimeo.

Over the past months I've been working with Australian photographer Ray Collins to bring his amazing oceanscapes to life in the form of cinemagraphs, a blend between photography and video. Each cinemagraph is created from one of Ray's stills, and sets it in infinite motion, making a unique moment in time last forever.

These cinemagraphs inspired André Heuvelman from the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra to get together with pianist Jeroen van Vliet to record a very moving custom soundtrack, which I combined with a selection of the cinemagraphs.

You can see the original cinemagraphs at http://armanddijcks.com/cinemagraphs-waves

Ray's images can be found at https://raycollinsphoto.com

André Heuvelman's music: http://andreheuvelman.com

Cuba! Love Story

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Kobi Israel - "Cuba! Love Story" is a personal travelogue which was created over the course of twelve years exploring notions of the macho and the masculine/militant versus the homoerotic in revolutionary Cuba. These notions were very familiar to the photographer from his youth and adolescence in Israel, a time during which his confusion and bewilderment about masculinity were left unresolved.

A Man Feeding Swans in the Snow

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"A Man Feeding Swans in the Snow" (Marcin Ryzcek) - The photograph was taken in Cracow, from the Grunwald Bridge. The nature-created contrast of white snow and dark water, the two separated by a straight line of the waterfront, serves as a reflection of the Yin Yang symbol of opposing, yet complementary forces.

The dark silhouette of a man against the light background and the white swans on dark water which are surrounded by a ring of black ducks complement the photograph, enabling numerous interpretations of it.

Cinematic City

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Thomas Béhuret, b. 1976, is a French photographer who lives and works in Paris.

After various odd jobs and a career in the restaurant industry in his youth, Thomas decided to follow his creative instinct and focus on photography as a full-time career. 

In his photography, Thomas captures cinematic city scenes, manages to find loopholes and draw clever portraits from urban culture and its daily surroundings.

One part of Thomas inspirational sources is drawn from his work documenting industrial complexes and factory buildings throughout France, which was done on commission by various companies and agencies.

For several years his work has appeared in a number of cultural magazines in both Paris and Montreal, Canada where he lived for some years. Thomas work has been exposed in several galleries and festivals and some of his work can be seen on permanent display at the L'Oeil Ouvert photographic gallery in Paris and on the Tryffelgrisen Gallery website.