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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

Bom fim-de-semana.

Between 1945 and 1962, the United States conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear bomb tests. For each of those tests, the government used multiple cameras filming at 2,400 frames per second to document things. Over 700 of the films have been declassified so far, and they’re currently being uploaded to YouTube.

The videos are being uploaded by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of Livermore, California, which conducted the original nuke tests. Researchers and film experts are going through the roughly 10,000 films that were previously classified and stored around the country in high-security vaults.

So far 6,000 have been found, 4,000 have been scanned, and 750 have been declassified.

Since the film reels weren’t stored properly, they’re in the process of decomposing and losing their images, so a team is working to digitize and preserve the data so that the footage is preserved for the future.

64 of the nuclear bomb explosion videos can now be found through Livermore’s YouTube account, and some of the footage is awe-inspiring and terrifying:

The tests in these videos were all done after the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

Preserving this footage for posterity is important due to the fact that the United States no longer conducts nuclear weapons testing, but instead uses old testing data and new computer modeling for research.

You can find the entire collection of videos over on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory YouTube channel.

 

From PetaPixel.

Peter van Agtmael - Disco Night Sept. 11

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Disco Night Sept. 11 is a chronicle of America's wars from 2006-2013. The photographs shift back and forth from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to the USA, unsparingly capturing the violent, ceaseless cost, but also the mystery and the madness, the beauty and absurdity at the core of each conflict. The narrative is complemented by nineteen gatefolds which elaborate on places and individuals.

 

Photographs are fragments, sometimes only loosely tied to important experiences. An extensive text records some of the missing pieces. The stories that precede and follow the moment of the photograph, conversations with soldiers, anonymous graffiti that's part confession, part boast.

 

Disco Night Sept. 11 is an expansive yet intimate account of this defining era of history.

V E Day in London 1945

V E Day began with Mr Churchill's broadcast officially announcing the end of war in Europe. Londoners took to the streets in celebrations which continued for nearly two days. Outside Buckingham Palace the crowds chanted 'we want the King' and were rewarded by the Royal Family appearing on the balcony. At nine o'clock in the evening the King broadcast to Britain and the Commonwealth.

German Atrocities.

English MP Mrs. Mavis Tate shows proof of the holocaust with shots from her visit to a German concentratino camp. Taken from the original 1945 British Pathe newsreel "German Atrocities - Proof". This Pathe newsreel showed the world at the time what atrocities had been committed. The MP, Mavis Tate describes eloquently what she saw at Buchenwald concentration camps.

Wilfred Owen - Anthem for Doomed Youth

What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?

      — Only the monstrous anger of the guns.

      Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle

Can patter out their hasty orisons.

No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells; 

      Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,—

The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;

      And bugles calling for them from sad shires.

 

What candles may be held to speed them all?

      Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes

Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.

      The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall;

Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,

And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds.

Written between September and October 1917, when Owen was a patient at Craiglockhart War Hospital in Edinburgh recovering from shell shock, the poem is a lament for young soldiers whose lives were unnecessarily lost in the European War. The poem is also a comment on Owen's rejection of his religion in 1915. While in the hospital, Owen met and became close friends with another poet, Siegfried Sassoon. Owen asked for his assistance in refining his poems' rough drafts. It was Sassoon who named the start of the poem "anthem", and who also substituted "doomed" for "dead"; the famous epithet of "patient minds" is also a correction of his. The poem is among those set in the War Requiem of Benjamin Britten.