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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

Malika Favre’s “Coding 101”

From The New Yorker:

"I decided to look at the future so I could create a positive image,” Malika Favre says, about her cover for the Tech Issue. “When you read about women sharing their experiences in a field that is so dominated by males, it can get pretty depressing. For me, it’s obvious that the solution has to start from a young age, with education and the games kids play.”

Screen Time

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From The New Yorker:

Television was my primary relationship when I was a child. It was my third parent, but it was the only parent that meant anything to me, or that had anything to teach me,” Bruce Eric Kaplan said, about his inspiration for this week’s cover. Kaplan, who is a prolific cartoonist and a writer for television shows such as “Girls,” “Six Feet Under,” and “Seinfeld,” was greatly influenced by what he described as the “huge, enormous box in the living room.” “I loved television so much that I wanted to crawl into the TV and live there, which I ended up doing by becoming a television writer,” he said. “I’d rather be in a fictional living room than in a real one. I still feel that way when I’m drawing a cartoon. I’d rather be inside my cartoon, in a world that I can control, that looks right to me, than out there in real life.” Of course, the experience of watching television as a child that Kaplan recalls is now largely a remnant of the past. “Television has now gone beyond television,” Kaplan said, meaning that the medium has expanded beyond the traditional family gathering in a living room now that we are able to stream shows on any device with a screen. “It’s a much different world,” he lamented. “Everyone’s watching their own thing, at their own time, on their own little thing.”

Some Of My Best Friends Are Records

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From "The Shape of Ideas: An Illustrated Exploration of Creativity" by Grant Snider

 

What does an idea look like? And where do they come from? Grant Snider’s illustrations will motivate you to explore these questions, inspire you to come up with your own answers and, like all Gordian knots, prompt even more questions. Whether you are a professional artist or designer, a student pursuing a creative career, a person of faith, someone who likes walks on the beach, or a dreamer who sits on the front porch contemplating life, this collection of one- and two-page comics will provide insight into the joys and frustrations of creativity, inspiration, and process—no matter your age or creative background.

Liberty's Flameout

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From The New Yorker:

Under more ordinary circumstances, the cover of the issue for February 13 and 20, 2017—our Anniversary Issue, marking ninety-two years—would feature some version of Rea Irvin’s classic image of the monocled dandy Eustace Tilley. This year, as a response to the opening weeks of the Trump Administration, particularly the executive order on immigration, we feature John W. Tomac’s dark, unwelcoming image, “Liberty’s Flameout.” “It used to be that the Statue of Liberty, and her shining torch, was the vision that welcomed new immigrants. And, at the same time, it was the symbol of American values,” Tomac says. “Now it seems that we are turning off the light.”

Michael Dumontier & Neil Farber - Library

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Neil Farber and Michael Dumontier are founding members of the artist collective Royal Art Lodge, formed in the mid-’90s by a half dozen young Canadians wanting to hang out together during the cold winters, listen to music, and collaborate on art. What started as a pile of drawings in a suitcase in a run-down studio space in industrial Winnipeg, Manitoba, has become a lifelong practice for the entire group, taking the Royal Art Lodge’s works to galleries and museums across North America, the U.K., Italy, France, Japan, Mexico, and elsewhere. Neil, Michael, and other founding members like Marcel Dzama and Jon Pylypchuk have all become significant solo artists, even as they continue to collaborate.