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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

Faber Franco

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Colombian photographer Faber Franco likes to play with hidden characters that only partly reveal themselves to the viewer. His images have a dreamy and melancholic feel to it while he also experiments with surreal settings and playful elements. Most of his photographs are self-portraits. You can see more of his works on his Flickr.

Laura Stevens

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Laura Stevens (b. 1977 England, UK) is a photographer currently based in Paris. Her work has been exhibited internationally at numerous galleries and festivals, at institutions including The Schneider Gallery, The National Portrait Gallery, The Centre for Fine Art Photography, Galerie Esther Woerdehoff, The Singapore International Photography Festival and Fotofever, with work represented in private collections. Stevens has received many accolades for her work, she was awarded as a Flash Forward Emerging Photographer by the Magenta Foundation in 2012, was a Critical Mass Top 50 winner in 2014, received a special distinction in the LensCulture Emerging Talents Award in the same year and was a finalist in The Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize in 2013 and 2014. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts and Design from Leeds Metropolitan University, and a Master’s degree in Photography from the University of Brighton.

Peter Holliday

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Peter Holliday is a Scottish photographer living and working in Helsinki. After graduating from Glasgow School of Art in 2015, Peter was one of 20 graduates selected by Creative Review for their UK-wide Talent-Spotting feature in association with JCDecaux. His work has appeared in publications such as the British Journal of Photography, Wired, It's Nice That, and Der Greif. In 2015 Peter was invited to exhibit his series Where the Land Rises at the Reykjavík Museum of Photography. In 2016 his work was shown at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles. Most recently Peter was nominated for the Magnum Photos Graduate Photographers Award 2017. He is currently studying MA Photography at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.

Sara Nicomedi

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Sara Nicomedi studied photography at the Roman College of Photography in Roma. She moved to London in 2010 and since then she is a freelance photographer, working as a street and documentary photographer. 
She exhibited her works in different Countries and Festivals between Italy, UK, Germany, USA, Singapore and Russia.
She is focusing her attention mainly on the human condition of common people who lives in this era of huge changes, on their sense of loss and solitude, insecurity and instability.

Since 2017 Sara is part of the photography collective InQuadra

From 2017 she is one of the organizer of the London Street Photography Festival.

Being Socialized

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Google translated from Sven Serkis's Site:

"Being socialized" is dedicated to the lure of becoming visible in social media, but raises the question of the fear of (digital) clearance. 

"Being socialized" consists of a series of portraits. The depicted men and women have staged themselves in self-selected locations that reflect them and their personalities. Their faces are veiled, anonymous. 

"Being socialized" wants to know: are we ready to praise all of us on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Co., to make the public public and completely naked and defenseless? 

Jesse Lizotte

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Jesse Lizotte was born in Sydney and raised in New York. At the age of 12, he returned to Australia and now frequents both countries. With no formal training in photography, Jesse’s work depicts a genuine sense of honesty and curiosity in the people, places and moments that he captures.

Jesse is driven by an interest in the way in which people on the fringes of society influence popular culture and fashion, with his subject matter often gravitating towards subcultures, whether it be skateboarders, lowriders or musicians. Jesse’s approach to his subjects is honest and considerate, fostering natural connections that are evident in his portraiture. His images evoke a sense of familiarity for the viewer, yet his photographic sensibilities give a fresh perspective. The scenes he creates have a filmic quality, capturing both tension and movement. Jesse presented his first solo exhibition titled ‘Lowrider’ at China Heights Gallery in Sydney in 2014 and has since exhibited his work in Melbourne, Los Angeles, and London.

Jesse has shot stills and motion work for clients such as; P.E Nation, Adidas, Map of the Heart, 10 Magazine, GQ Magazine, Oyster, i-D, Diesel, INPRINT, among many others.

Alexandra Leese

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From i-D magazine:

Photographer Alexandra Leese was raised in Hong Kong until she was 11, before moving to London to study. As with many biracial Brits, on moving to England her identity soon became defined by a sense of othering from her classmates and a subsequent desire to just blend in. “When I was younger I wasn't aware of being ‘the other'. But as I got older, I realised people would describe me as ‘the girl from Hong Kong', so I adapted and quickly became very English. The older I got, the more I realise that was something I had done.” Studying fine art at Chelsea College of Art, Alexandra slowly gravitated towards photography. Now based in south London and spending her time shooting fashion and portraits, her imagery contemplates identity with a refreshing, unique candour; one undoubtedly afforded her in part by a dual-heritage.

Colin Combs

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From The New Yorker:

Far more affection than angst figures in the adolescent wasteland where the eighteen-year-old photographer Colin Combs portrays his friends, most of them high-school seniors from Dayton, Ohio. Combs’s home town is sometimes called the heroin capital of the United States. His mother, a respiratory therapist, has stories of patients who have overdosed or suffered from trafficking; his father, a car salesman, speaks warily of a gas station near his workplace that attracts opioid addicts. “It’s pretty much everywhere,” Combs said. But he has no interest in succumbing to the specious glory of drugs. In his vivid, unvarnished stills, Dayton instead assumes a melancholy splendor, sheltering artists and skaters whose insouciant dignity resists the clichés that accrue to youth.

 

Tania Franco-Klein

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From i-D magazine:

The photography of Tania Franco-Klein evokes a sense of tragicomedy worthy of Samuel Beckett — only this time, Godot may well show up and offer you a job at his tech startup. With elaborate sets and scenic colour contrasts, the Mexican photographer constructs enigmatic scenes where existential angst converses with the implied decline of Western society, often with a good dose of satire. “All my work is about social behaviour and solitude,” a surprisingly upbeat, 27-year-old tells me when we meet at a local canteen in the Roma Sur district of her native Mexico City. “Technology is supposed to bring us together, but instead it’s taking us apart.”