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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

Des Gens et des Musées

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Nicolas Krief has lived in Paris his whole life. He works for several French newspapers and magazines (Le Monde, Paris Match, Le Figaro Magazine, Ideat, The Good Life, Télérama…) and collaborates with art institutions.

At the age of 20, he read a book that deeply influenced him: Roland Barthes’s Mythologies. He discovered that another intelligence of the signs of our times, the strength of the language against the formula or the evidences. Photography as he tries to practice it only gains purpose through what it communicates and its contribution to a better understanding of reality. He likes to emphasize the literary and epic dimension of the most ordinary situations.

His personal works lead him behind the scenes of museums and major exhibitions, where he explores our relationship to art and the work of art, in the series Accrochages

For several years, he has also undertaken a social and cultural portrait of rural France. His series «Jours de Fête» captures moments of sociability in the Sarthe countryside (France).

Nicolas Krief defines himself as a street photographer: his photographs are snapshots. No staging therefore, no additional lighting, and no cropping.

Roadside Lights

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Eiji Ohashi: Coming close to dusk, city and country both alike, the roadside vending machines light up. This particular scene of vending machines placed on ordinary roadsides is unique to Japan.

Looking at the vending machines been placed in the wilderness or downtown, one can see loneliness being illustrated.

The machines work non-stop despite day or night, but would be taken away once the sale drops. The machines would not exist if each and everyone does not have its own color and shine. It just might be depicting the nature of us human.

Liz Johnson Artur

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Liz Johnson Artur (born 1964) is a Ghanaian-Russian photographer based in London, England. Her work documents the lives of black people from across the African Diaspora. Her work strives to display and celebrate the normal, the vibrant and the subtle nuances of each of these people lives that she encounters. Johnson Artur works as a photojournalist and editorial photographer for various fashion magazines and record labels all over the world, as well as her independent artistic practice. Her monograph with Bierke Verlag was included in the "Best Photo Books 2016" list of The New York Times.

Florian Hetz

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Florian Hetz is a Berlin based photographer. He started his professional career in opera and dance theatre in Germany. A severe encephalitis put an abrupt end to his professional life. In the process of returning to full health he picked up a camera to document daily life, in the form of a visual diary, to fight potential memory loss as part of the after-effects of the brain inflammation. From taking photos of his friends and lovers he eventually moved on to creating photos based on the imagery in his head.

Much of Hetz's work circles around the hidden memories of a pre-coming out time and intimacy. Memories of confusingly arousing moments, that many queer people experience at young ages without knowing how to read or act on them. By taking close ups of seemingly normal body parts and gestures, Hetz brings the focus to their highly sexual undertone. Like looking through a glory hole, Hetz only shows a fragment of the moment, and viewers are invited to create their own narrative.