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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

(We Don't Need This) Fascist Groove Thang

LCD Soundsystem cover Heaven 17's "(We Don't Need This) Fascist Groove Thang" in the Electric Lady Sessions

 

Have you heard it on the news
About this fascist groove thang
Evil men with racist views
Spreading all across the land
Don't just sit there on your ass
Unlock that funky chaindance
Brothers, sisters shoot your best
We don't need this fascist groove thang

 

Brothers, sisters, we don't need this fascist groove thang

 

History will repeat itself
Crisis point we're near the hour
Counterforce will do no good
Hot you ass I feel your power
Hitler proves that funky stuff
Is not for you and me girl
Europe's an unhappy land
They've had their fascist groove thang

 

Brothers, sisters, we don't need this fascist groove thang

 

Democrats are out of power
Across that great wide ocean
Reagan's president elect
Fascist god in motion
Generals tell him what to do
Stop your good time dancing
Train their guns on me and you
Fascist thang advancing

 

Brothers, sisters, we don't need this fascist groove thang

 

Sisters, brothers lend a hand
Increase our population
Grab that groove thang by the throat
And throw it in the ocean
You're real tonight you move my soul
Let's cruise out of the dance war
Come out your house and dance your dance
Shake that fascist groove thang
(Shake it!)

 

"(We Don't Need This) Fascist Groove Thang" is a song written and performed by British synthpop band Heaven 17. It was a minor hit in the UK in 1981, despite being banned by the BBC. It was also a minor dance hit in the US. It developed from an instrumental, "Groove Thang", that Martyn Ware and Ian Craig Marsh created earlier that year for Music for Stowaways, an album they released under the British Electric Foundation name.

Some Call it a Conspiracy: A Malcolm London Story

A reflective and mediative look at Malcolm London: a poet, activist, and musical artist from Chicago, IL.

Deleted and Bonus Scenes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhSrt...

 

Featuring:
Malcolm London @MalcolmLondon (https://open.spotify.com/album/4Yybss...)
Chicago Soundbox https://www.facebook.com/HighwayRadioCSB
Chance The Rapper @chancetherapper
Tasha @wowtashawow
Timmy V @TimmyVoltchek
Kevin Coval @kevincoval
Marcus Atom @marcusatom
Malcolm’s Grandma

 

Directed by David Huzieran
Director Of Photography: Jake Zalutsky
Produced by Luca Valente
Executive Producers: Nick Santore & David Huzieran
Production Company: Strange Loop Studios (http://www.StrangeLoop.tv)

 

B Cam Operator: Christian Mejia
1st AC : Matt Miele, Eugene Hahm, & David Thomas
Gaffer: Danny Valdez
Movi & Jib Operator: Tom Szklarski
Location Sound Mixers: Jon Farley & Scott Palmer

 

Edited by Jordan Bracewell
Assistant Editors: Taymen Gindo & Colin Santangelo
Original Music by Justin Lee Radford (http://www.justinleeradford.com)

Colorist: Mikey Pehanich @ The Mill
Color Producers: Laurie Adrianopoli & Dan Butler @ The Mill
Post Sound: Nicholas Couscouris

 

Special thanks to: Pilar McQuirter, Kate Begani, Terrence Thompson, Alvin Boutte and the students of Bronzeville Academy.

Protest Footage Provided by Terrence Thompson.

Ted Talks Footage Courtesy of TED: https://www.ted.com/talks/malcolm_lon...

Photos by Nuccio DiNuzzo courtesy of Chicago Tribune. © 2015 Chicago Tribune: http://www.chicagotribune.com/chi-nuc...

Subscribe Now: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-StrangeLoop

Follow Strange Loop on Instagram: http://instagram.com/strangeloop.tv

© 2018 Strange Loop Studios, LLC

Figures of Speech

From the Almeida Theatre site:

We believe what changes opinion, changes narrative, changes momentum, are words. Words crafted from genuinely big ideas, delivered through deft structure by inspirational women and men, wherever a meaningful audience can be found.

By exploring some of the world’s most vital speeches we want to remember what leadership sounds like, through speeches which have carved a path through our history by changing hearts and minds.

Sic transit...

From the New York Times:

Covering white supremacists poses difficult challenges for Times journalists. Are we simply providing a platform for them to recruit followers and spread hate? Are we casting a sympathetic light on people who should only be condemned?

We believe that reporting on racism, anti-Semitism, and the people and groups who espouse them is a crucial responsibility for journalists today.

By investigating an emerging leader in a growing extremist movement, we hope to offer Times readers and viewers a deeper understanding of the people and forces behind these groups.

The Social Contract

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From Existential Comics:

Social Contract Theory is the area of philosophy that deals with how an individual deals with the society that they belong to. In modern philosophy, it is mostly closely associated with Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Hobbes, in particular, thought that humans were naturally in an "all against all" violent state before civilization, and in order to avoid this, individuals cede authority to a sovereign. Rousseau argued for a more democratic society (although Hobbes was neccesarily arguing against democracy, but merely for a unified society), where instead of a single sovereign, we cede our rights to the will of the majority. He attempted to reconcile individual freedom with this sort of ceding of rights to the majority, or to a society as a whole. For Rousseau, in some sense, in order to fully become free we had to give up some of our freedom, because a society which individuals did not give up freedom would be less free. Although not an example Rousseau gives, we can see that a society where individuals give up the right to own slaves becomes more free, on the whole. If we do not form some kind of social contract, then it becomes very difficult to guarantee any kind of legitimate freedom for anyone, because anyone's freedom could be taken away by arbitrary force.

Camus, while he didn't explicitly talk about social contract theory, was something of an anarchist, and wrote in The Rebel that an individual must always have the right to rebel against an unjust society.

 

Inflammatory Essays

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Written in between 1979 and 1982 and printed in 2010, Jenny Holzer’s “Inflammatory Essays” employ her so-called “truisms," gleaned from popular ideas and ideologies. Rather than being projected in public spaces or casting them aglow in LED, here sentences form individual “essays.” Originally pasted around New York City, many of the texts reveal the polemical tone of manifestos, as they are oftentimes excerpted from speeches. Posted anonymously, the texts become relatively open signs, applicable to several situations. Holzer insists that the reader consider the texts and slogans with which we are inundated.