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luís soares

Blog do escritor Luís Soares

Figures of Speech

From the Almeida Theatre site:

We believe what changes opinion, changes narrative, changes momentum, are words. Words crafted from genuinely big ideas, delivered through deft structure by inspirational women and men, wherever a meaningful audience can be found.

By exploring some of the world’s most vital speeches we want to remember what leadership sounds like, through speeches which have carved a path through our history by changing hearts and minds.

Sic transit...

From the New York Times:

Covering white supremacists poses difficult challenges for Times journalists. Are we simply providing a platform for them to recruit followers and spread hate? Are we casting a sympathetic light on people who should only be condemned?

We believe that reporting on racism, anti-Semitism, and the people and groups who espouse them is a crucial responsibility for journalists today.

By investigating an emerging leader in a growing extremist movement, we hope to offer Times readers and viewers a deeper understanding of the people and forces behind these groups.

The Social Contract

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From Existential Comics:

Social Contract Theory is the area of philosophy that deals with how an individual deals with the society that they belong to. In modern philosophy, it is mostly closely associated with Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Hobbes, in particular, thought that humans were naturally in an "all against all" violent state before civilization, and in order to avoid this, individuals cede authority to a sovereign. Rousseau argued for a more democratic society (although Hobbes was neccesarily arguing against democracy, but merely for a unified society), where instead of a single sovereign, we cede our rights to the will of the majority. He attempted to reconcile individual freedom with this sort of ceding of rights to the majority, or to a society as a whole. For Rousseau, in some sense, in order to fully become free we had to give up some of our freedom, because a society which individuals did not give up freedom would be less free. Although not an example Rousseau gives, we can see that a society where individuals give up the right to own slaves becomes more free, on the whole. If we do not form some kind of social contract, then it becomes very difficult to guarantee any kind of legitimate freedom for anyone, because anyone's freedom could be taken away by arbitrary force.

Camus, while he didn't explicitly talk about social contract theory, was something of an anarchist, and wrote in The Rebel that an individual must always have the right to rebel against an unjust society.

 

Inflammatory Essays

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Written in between 1979 and 1982 and printed in 2010, Jenny Holzer’s “Inflammatory Essays” employ her so-called “truisms," gleaned from popular ideas and ideologies. Rather than being projected in public spaces or casting them aglow in LED, here sentences form individual “essays.” Originally pasted around New York City, many of the texts reveal the polemical tone of manifestos, as they are oftentimes excerpted from speeches. Posted anonymously, the texts become relatively open signs, applicable to several situations. Holzer insists that the reader consider the texts and slogans with which we are inundated.

Grada Kilomba - Plantation Memories

"Grada Kilomba's book 'Plantation Memories. Episodes of Everyday Racism' has exposed the violence and trauma of racism through its incisive language and profound writing. This staged reading is a compilation of episodes exploring everyday racism in the form of short psychoanalytical stories. It offers a strong and moving insight into the experience of racism, alienation, and transformation, through the different characters."
Theater Ballhaus Naunynstrasse

 

"Com uma escrita profunda e uma linguagem cortante e eloquente, Grada Kilomba expõe a violência e o trauma do racismo no seu livro' "Plantation Memories. Episódios de Racismo Diário." Esta leitura cênica traz o livro ao palco, através de uma compilação de episódios que exploram o racismo diário em forma de histórias psicanalíticas curtas. Oferecendo uma visão forte e comovente, através das diferentes personagens. "
Teatro Ballhaus Naunynstrasse


Written and Directed by / Escrito e Dirigido por
Grada Kilomba

 

Performance
Martha Fessehatzion
Moses Leo
Michael Edode Ojake
Araba Walton
Sara-Hiruth Zewde

 

Music
GEISBABA

 

Camera
Zé de Paiva
Kathleen Kunath
Thabo Thindi


Grada Kilomba é uma escritora, teórica, e artista interdisciplinar portuguesa residente em Berlim. O seu trabalho baseia-se na memória, trauma, raça e gênero, e foi traduzido em várias línguas e publicados em inúmeras antologias internacionais, bem como encenado internacionalmente.
O seu trabalho é especialmente conhecido por criar um espaço híbrido onde as fronteiras entre as linguagens académicas e artísticas se confinam, usando uma variedade de formatos desde a escrita à encenação dos seus textos, assim como instalações de video e performance, criando o que ela chama de "Performing Knowledge.” Grada Kilomba tem apresentado o seu trabalho em renomeados espaços de exibição, teatro, e academia, como o Vienna Secession Museum, Brussels Bozar Museum, London Maritime Museum, Centro International de Artes José de Guimarães, Kampnagel House, Oslo Literature House, Maxim Gorki Theater, Berliner Festspiel Haus, Ballhaus Naunynstrasse, Theater Münchner Kammerspiel, University of Stockholm, University of Amsterdam, University of London, University of Accra, Universidade do Rio de Janeiro, Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, among others.
Grada Kilomba tem ensinado em diversas universidades internacionais, tendo sido por último Professora de Estudos de Gênero e Estudos Pós-Coloniais, na Universidade de Humboldt, em Berlim. Actualmente, Grada Kilomba é curadora no Teatro Maxim Gorki, em Berlim, onde está a desenvolver uma série de Artist Talks e Post-colonialismo.
http://gradakilomba.com

 

Escrito e Dirigido por
Grada Kilomba

 

Performance por
Martha Fessehatzion
Moses Leo
Michael Edode Ojake
Araba Walton
Sara-Hiruth Zewde

 

Música por GEISBABA

 

Camera por
Zé de Paiva
Kathleen Kunath
Thabo Thindi

 

Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/5Tnb/

Angry and sad, frustrated and scared.

On Saturday hundreds of white nationalists, alt-righters, and neo-Nazis traveled to Charlottesville, Virginia to participate in the “Unite the Right” rally. By Saturday evening three people were dead – one protester, and two police officers – and many more injured.

 

“VICE News Tonight” correspondent Elle Reeve went behind the scenes with white nationalist leaders, including Christopher Cantwell, Robert Ray, David Duke, and Matthew Heimbach — as well as counter-protesters. VICE News Tonight also spoke with residents of Charlottesville, members of the Black Lives Matter movement, and the Charlottesville Police.

 

From the neo-Nazi protests at Emancipation Park to Cantwell’s hideaway outside of Virginia, “VICE News Tonight” provides viewers with exclusive, up close and personal access inside the unrest.

 

This episode of VICE News Tonight aired August 14, 2017 on HBO.